CONCERNS OVER POWERS OF CHINA’S NEW ANTI-GRAFT AGENCY

China’s new anti-corruption watchdog, the National Supervisory Commission, could be abusing its sweeping powers to detain people without access to legal counsel. Launched in March under a National Supervision Law, the Commission’s powers outrank courts and prosecutors, in line with China’s newly-revised constitution. The Commission can detain anybody suspected of graft for up to six months for investigation without access to a lawyer. Concerns were sparked by the case of blogger Chen Jieren placed under “residential surveillance at a designated ...


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